Stephen Henderson British, b. 1956

Stephen Henderson was brought up in an artistic family, taking inspiration from his father, the photographer and pop artist Nigel Henderson. His aesthetic approach was also informed by the work of sculptor Guy Taplin. Henderson's subject matter, though, comes from the wildlife, predominantly birds and fish, of the Essex coastal marshes, where he grew up and still lives today. Found driftwood and other treasures such as wire or pieces of metal are incorporated into the sculptures, giving them a material bond with the habitat of the creatures they represent.

 

Henderson had a job as a high end furniture and kitchen maker for 25 years before becoming aware of the fact that he might spend his life celebrating the wildlife that had been a backdrop to his life. From his father, Stephen had learnt to believe in his own eyes and delight in the finding of sidelined objects.

 

Found items turned down into trophies in their own right, taken off from the beach or from a wrecked boat and given new significance. Stephen's artwork was inspired by the native shorebirds and fish species of his locality, collectively with wildlife observed on holidays and travels abroad. Carving out pieces of existing wood and cedar, his work is usually mounted on driftwood. Stephen works on ideas such as motherhood, courtship and predation, struggling his best to reflect the mannerisms of individual creatures and their personalities.

 

Currently the workshop and studio at his family home reflect and depict those very same Essex marshes, providing a constant source of sublime art and inspiration. His work can be traced in hotels, homes and private collections across the globe.

 

 

Stephen has developed a unique painting technique by combining emulsion wash with stained glass and clear wax. These helped create subtle approximations of scales and feathers, along with delicate silver leaf highlights. In recent years, he has gone on to do large-scale work, incorporating welded metal fittings and various metals recovered from recycled hot water tanks and galvanized iron. Another recent development was the introduction of a deciduous iron profile along with bleached driftwood. This gives a more natural and weathered look suitable for both outdoor and indoor use.

Henderson had a job as a high end furniture and kitchen maker for 25 years before becoming aware of the fact that he might spend his life celebrating the wildlife that had been a backdrop to his life. From his father, Stephen had learnt to believe in his own eyes and delight in the finding of sidelined objects.

 

Found items turned down into trophies in their own right, taken off from the beach or from a wrecked boat and given new significance. Stephen's artwork was inspired by the native shorebirds and fish species of his locality, collectively with wildlife observed on holidays and travels abroad. Carving out pieces of existing wood and cedar, his work is usually mounted on driftwood. Stephen works on ideas such as motherhood, courtship and predation, struggling his best to reflect the mannerisms of individual creatures and their personalities.

 

Currently the workshop and studio at his family home reflect and depict those very same Essex marshes, providing a constant source of sublime art and inspiration. His work can be traced in hotels, homes and private collections across the globe.

 

Stephen has developed a unique painting technique by combining emulsion wash with stained glass and clear wax. These helped create subtle approximations of scales and feathers, along with delicate silver leaf highlights. In recent years, he has gone on to do large-scale work, incorporating welded metal fittings and various metals recovered from recycled hot water tanks and galvanized iron. Another recent development was the introduction of a deciduous iron profile along with bleached driftwood. This gives a more natural and weathered look suitable for both outdoor and indoor use.